Tom Bagshaw’s Disney Villainess Prints

My husband pointed me in the direction of these fantastic prints of re-imagined Disney villainesses, and I just had to share.  These pieces by artist Tom Bagshaw depict the evil fairy Maleficent of “Sleeping Beauty” and the wicked step-mother from “Snow White” respectively.  Since the Disney version didn’t include the step-mother’s name, Bagshaw has titled the piece “Lucille” in deference to Lucille La Verne who voiced the character.  Of course, as you can see for yourselves, Bagshaw paints these wicked women as both younger and sexier than their Disney counterparts.

Tom Bagshaw's "Maleficent"

Tom Bagshaw's "Lucille"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on adding these prints to your collection, check out the Fine Grime Affordable Art Fair online store.

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Fairy Tale Halloween Costumes: Why So Scandalous?

As someone who loves candy, costumes, and stories of the spooky and supernatural, Halloween has always been my absolute favorite holiday.  Throughout the year, I gleefully dress up for Comic Conventions, movie/book openings, costume parties, and plays (I am an actor, after all.), but Halloween is the one time of the year when I can convince my friends to don their own costumes and take goofy photos with me (The exception is my husband, who humors me year-round.).

Last year, some of my friends and I went as characters from the video game "Left 4 Dead."

Needless to say, when I received a Halloween-themed Victorian Trading Co. catalog in the mail, I was pretty excited.  I couldn’t wait to scan the pages for costume ideas!  Imagine my delight when I spotted their lovely Little Red Riding Hood cape.

The Victorian Trading Company's "L'il Red Riding Hood Cape" is gorgeous.

Although the item itself was a little out of my price range, it inspired me to consider fairy tales as a theme for this year’s Halloween fun.  A quick search of the internet, however, convinced me otherwise; for whatever reason, a huge portion of fairy tale Halloween costumes are really trashy.  In the 2004 movie “Mean Girls,”  the main character (Lindsay Lohan) learns that “Halloween is the one night a year when girls can dress like a total slut and no other girls can say anything about it.”  Still, I was pretty surprised by some of the results my costume search turned up.  For instance, the photo of a Cinderella costume below (which I can only assume is modeled after the Disney character) bears almost no resemblance to Cinderella.

It's funny, but I remember Cinderella a little differently...

I guess I shouldn’t be surprised.  Admittedly, the original versions of fairy tales had a lot of violent and sexual undertones.  For instance, in the earliest versions of “Sleeping Beauty,” the princess isn’t awakened from her slumber by a romantic kiss; instead, she’s raped by the prince  and awoken when she goes into labor to bear twins.

Despite the fact that the original versions of many fairy tales were pretty racy, I think it would be a little far fetched to claim that barely there costumes like this one signify some sort of return to fairy tale roots.  I’m still not decided on what I’ll be going as for Halloween, but I will say one thing; if it’s fairy tale themed, I think I’ll try my hand at making it myself.

Once Upon a Webcomic: Ryan North Strikes Again

Some of you may recall last week’s Once Upon a Webcomic on Ryan North’s “Dinosaur Comics.”  Apparently, since that time, Ryan North has become determined to blow my mind.  His last three webcomic posts have been a fantastic series on fairy tales.

The first of these retells “Little Red Riding Hood” including some of the more disturbing details from older versions of the story.  Yes, in some versions, Little Red actually did eat her dead grandmother and escape because she told the wolf she had to poop and didn’t want to have an accident in the bed.

In his next comic, North addresses “Sleeping Beauty.”  Some of the information he gives us is true; the Prince really did rape the title character, causing her to give birth to the twins who woke her from her slumber.  Of course, he also provides us with some false information.  “Sleeping Beauty,” while it describes the character, is not her name.  She has been known, in different versions of the tale, as Talia, Aurora, Briar Rose, and more.

Finally, North writes a comic strip in which T-Rex tries to write his own less disturbing fairy tale.  Of course, he fails when he creates a story with a gender-confused protagonist (reminiscent of Ozma) who uses magic to enable her friends to cannibalize an evil wizard.

With any luck, Ryan North will keep reflecting on fairy tales in their grisly, original forms and make comic strips about even more of the old favorites.

Robin Hood and King Arthur: Real People as Fairy Tales

Robin Hood and King Arthur are both characters seen in stories that might be considered fairy tales.  In both cases, there seems to be no real author of their stories and no version which is more true than any other.

 

Robin Hood appeared as a fox in Disney's 1973 film "Robin Hood."

Robin Hood appeared as a fox in Disney's 1973 film "Robin Hood."

In fact, their stories are often retold by the same authors who spend their time retelling fairy tales.  For instance, Robin McKinley, who has written many retold fairy tales (My favorites of hers are “Rose Daughter” which retells “Beauty and the Beast” and “Spindle’s End” which retells “Sleeping Beauty.”), tackled the story of Robin Hood in her book “The Outlaws of Sherwood.”  Similarly, Garth Nix, who wrote “Hansel’s Eyes” (the best retelling of Hansel and Gretel I’ve ever come across), retold part of Arthur’s story in “Under the Lake,” a tale about the Lady of the Lake, Merlin, and Excalibur.  Not only that, but both of them starred in Disney versions of their tales; “Robin Hood” was released in 1973 and “The Sword in the Stone” which was based on the first section of T. H. White’s Arthur retelling “The Once and Future King” was released in 1963.

Although the existence of both is debated by modern historians, there is some evidence that each of them may have existed in real life. Robin first cropped up in ballads of which the oldest surviving is “Robin Hood and the Monk,” which dates to about 1450 A.D. and contains many of the characters and details which we still associate with Robin Hood today.  Arthur supposedly ruled Britain in the late 5th and early 6th centuries, according to medieval histories and romances.  The first datable historical reference to him appears in a 9th century Latin text.

Although it is possible that these men have only ever existed in folklore, it is also quite likely that they were once real people who have now become the stuff of fairy tales; their stories have been romanticized, made magical, and ingrained as part of our cultural knowledge. They are retold in books and films every year.  Robin Hood alone has been the main character of more than fifty films and television series, and has been featured in episodes of many shows.

It might be strange to imagine a historical figure becoming the stuff of legend, but it actually still happens today.  We all heard the story of George Washington and the cherry tree, as children, but that is actually a fabricated tale; no such event ever took place.  We also learned that he had false teeth made of wood.  In reality, however, they were carved of fine ivory and gold.  Compared to Robin Hood and King Arthur, George Washington is a fairly recent historical figure.  Despite this, his life is already becoming the stuff of legend.  In all likelihood, the tale will become more fanciful over the years.

Who knows?  Five centuries from now, George Washington may be remembered as a fabled warrior like Arthur or a great wizard like his mentor, Merlin.

Once Upon a Webcomic: Dinosaur Comics Fairy Tales

Since last week’s post on XKCD fairy tales was so popular and many of my favorite webcomics have referenced fairy tales in the past, I decided to start a new recurring feature called Once Upon a Webcomic.  My second webcomic post centers around another of my favorites: “Dinosaur Comics” or “Qwantz” by Ryan North.

Although Dinosaur Comics has referenced fairy tales on a number of hilarious occasions, the following comic is my favorite example of this.

As you can see, this comic takes a humorous poke at fairy tale retellings.  While many of them are interesting and inventive, some do seem a little silly.  For instance, take a look at the plot of Disney’s upcoming film, “Snow White and the Seven“; if Snow White is a British woman in China in the 1800s and the dwarves are actually not dwarves but international warriors teaching her how to fight, is it really even the same story?  Sure, the concept sounds pretty cool, but at what point does it begin to distract from the actual story and become a little pointless?

I can’t help but feel the same about Maureen McGowan’s new books “Sleeping Beauty: Vampire Slayer” and “Cinderella: Ninja Warrior.” I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt and read them on the off chance that they may actually be cool and funny mash-ups, but frankly they sound a little ridiculous.  Hopefully, that’s intentional.

When retelling fairy tales, it can be easy to get caught up in trying to make everything “totally sweet” and forget about what you were actually trying to do in the first place; breathe life back into an old story.  Of course, that doesn’t mean space travel and fairy tales should never mix; in her book of short fairy tale retellings “Red as Blood,” Tanith Lee masterfully reconciles these genres in “Beauty,” a futuristic retelling of “Beauty and the Beast.”

To see some other fairy tale references in Dinosaur Comics, check out the comics from November 20, 2003 and May 31, 2006.

Dear Blank, Please Blank – Fairy Tale Edition

Check out the fantastic entry I found on “Dear Blank, Please Blank.”

“Dear parents,

Jasmine was in a relationship with a dirty homeless boy named Aladdin. Snow White lived alone with 7 men. Pinnochio was a liar. Robin Hood was a thief. Tarzan walked around without clothes on. A stranger kissed sleeping beauty and she married him. Cinderella lied and snuck out at night to attend a party.

Sincerely, it’s not our fault, it’s how you raised us”

Although this post does a lot to boil context off of these stories, I have to admit its hilarity.  Interestingly, although many fairy tales are morality tales and discourage bad behavior, this post points out all the things the characters are actually getting away with.  Not only that, but most of the characters actually made worse choices than we tell modern children.  For instance, Sleeping Beauty didn’t just marry a stranger who kissed her; she married a stranger who raped her.

In Disney's "Sleeping Beauty," the princess was awakened with a kiss. In some earlier versions, however, the prince raped her in her sleep and she did not awaken until she gave birth.

For those of you unfamiliar with “Dear Blank, Please Blank,” it’s a funny site where people can essentially make jokes only in that form.  It’s reasonably self-explanatory, but people pick the to, the from, and a humorous message to go in between.  If you’d like to see the post in its original form, click here.

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